Mera pind essay in punjabi

This is a mera pind essay in punjabi article. Click here for more information. At the front of the stage a screen hangs down with the projected image of a tuxedoed man holding up a text and performing.

In the foreground is a gramophone with two horns. In the background, a large audience is seated at orchestra level and on several balconies. The words “Chronomégaphone” and “Gaumont” appear at both the bottom of the illustration and, in reverse, at the top of the projection screen. The first known public exhibition of projected sound films took place in Paris in 1900, but decades passed before sound motion pictures were made commercially practical. The primary steps in the commercialization of sound cinema were taken in the mid- to late 1920s. Sound-on-film, however, would soon become the standard for talking pictures. By the early 1930s, the talkies were a global phenomenon.

On the left is a large acoustical horn, suspended from a cord that rises out of the frame. A man plays a violin in front of it. To the right, two men dance together. The idea of combining motion pictures with recorded sound is nearly as old as the concept of cinema itself. 1895, but individual, cabinet viewing of motion pictures was soon to be outmoded by successes in film projection.

Kinetophone, the system required individual use of earphones. These appear to be the first publicly exhibited films with projection of both image and recorded sound. Phonorama and yet another sound-film system—Théâtroscope—were also presented at the Exposition. Three major problems persisted, leading to motion pictures and sound recording largely taking separate paths for a generation. The primary issue was synchronization: pictures and sound were recorded and played back by separate devices, which were difficult to start and maintain in tandem. Sufficient playback volume was also hard to achieve.

While motion picture projectors soon allowed film to be shown to large theater audiences, audio technology before the development of electric amplification could not project satisfactorily to fill large spaces. Finally, there was the challenge of recording fidelity. Illustration of a red-haired woman wearing a large hat, an ankle-length yellow dress, and high heels. She is holding a long baton or swagger stick and leaning against a film projector. A gramophone sits at her feet.

The top of the illustration reads “Phono-Cinéma-Théâtre”. Text to the left of the woman reads “Visions Animées des Artistes Celèbres”, followed by a list of performers. Cinematic innovators attempted to cope with the fundamental synchronization problem in a variety of ways. Four years later, Gaumont introduced the Elgéphone, a compressed-air amplification system based on the Auxetophone, developed by British inventors Horace Short and Charles Parsons.

Despite high expectations, Gaumont’s sound innovations had only limited commercial success—though improvements, they still did not satisfactorily address the three basic issues with sound film and were expensive as well. For some years, American inventor E. Kinetoscope cabinet, they were now projected onto a screen. The phonograph was connected by an intricate arrangement of pulleys to the film projector, allowing—under ideal conditions—for synchronization. However, conditions were rarely ideal, and the new, improved Kinetophone was retired after little more than a year. By the mid-1910s, the groundswell in commercial sound motion picture exhibition had subsided. United States: eight hours worth of projected visuals involving both slides and live action were synchronized with separately recorded lectures and musical performances played back on phonograph.

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