Love is not the only basis for marriage essay

It claimed that such issues were love is not the only basis for marriage essay concern of the people involved, and no one else. In addition, some free love writing has argued that both men and women have the right to sexual pleasure without social or legal restraints.

According to today’s stereotype, earlier middle-class Americans wanted the home to be a place of stability in an uncertain world. To this mentality are attributed strongly-defined gender roles, which led to a minority reaction in the form of the free-love movement. 1970s, historically the free-love movement has not advocated multiple-sexual partners or short-term sexual relationships. Rather, it has argued that sexual relations that are freely entered into should not be regulated by law. The term “sex radical” is also used interchangeably with the term “free lover”, and was the preferred term by advocates because of the negative connotations of “free love”. By whatever name, advocates had two strong beliefs: opposition to the idea of forced sexual activity in a relationship and advocacy for a woman to use her body in any way that she pleases. At the turn of the 20th century, some free-love proponents extended the critique of marriage to argue that marriage as a social institution encourages emotional possessiveness and psychological enslavement.

For example, the law often allowed a husband to beat his wife. Free-love advocates argued that many children were born into unloving marriages out of compulsion, but should instead be the result of choice and affection—yet children born out of wedlock did not have the same rights as children with married parents. In the 19th century at least six books endorsed the concept of free love, all of which were written by men. Of the four major free-love periodicals following the U. Mary Gove Nichols was the leading-female advocate and the woman most looked up to in the free-love movement. Her autobiography became the first argument against marriage written from a woman’s point of view.

To proponents of free love, the act of sex was not just about reproduction. These people believed that by talking about female sexuality, they would help empower women. To help achieve this goal, such radical thinkers relied on the written word, books, pamphlets, and periodicals, and by these means the movement was sustained for over fifty years, spreading the message of free love all over the United States. Pictured, they are being rounded up for their heretical views. A number of utopian social movements throughout history have shared a vision of free love. Middle East from the 1st century BC to the 1st century AD apparently shunned sex, marriage, and slavery.

North Africa in the 2nd, 3rd and 4th centuries and rejected marriage. 1895, noted that a number of “communistic” movements throughout the Middle Ages also rejected marriage. 10th to 14th century Western Europe freed followers from all moral prohibition and religious obligation, but respected those who lived simply, avoided the taking of human or animal life, and were celibate. Women had an uncommon equality and autonomy, even as religious leaders.

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