Jane eyre setting essay

Free jane eyre papers, essays, and research papers. Parallel to many of the great feministic novels throughout literary history, Jane Eyre is a story about the quest for authentic love. However, Jane Eyre is unique and separate from other romantic pieces, in that it is also about a woman searching for jane eyre setting essay sense of self-worth through achieving a degree of independence.

Orphaned and dismissed at an early age, Jane was born into a modest lifestyle that was characterized by a form of oppressive servitude of which she had no autonomy. She was busy spending much of her adolescent years locked in chains, both imaginary and real, as well as catering to the needs of her peers. Jane Eyre’ Charlotte Brontë focuses on the life of Jane, an unwanted orphan who can’t do anything right in the eyes of her aunt. When she is about nine she is sent to Lowood Institute where she is also treated as inferior by Mr Brocklehurst.

Although Jane is treated so cruelly and unfairly all her life she proves everyone wrong in the end by making something of herself. There are many parts of the book where we feel sympathy for Jane. Would a person describe the personality and acts of their mothers as loving or nurturing or quite possibly witty with her words. Throughout history the idea of the hero or heroine has changed, but some common attributes remain. Humans learn from severe situations. Being a stranger in a harsh environment forces humanity to open to new capabilities, and learning from these hardships makes a person prepared for life’s final exam.

Jane Eyre”, by Charlotte Bronte is a picaresque that revolves around a girl name Jane. Bronte places Jane at Marsh End because she wanted her to see the nature of the world and to show the reader that life comes with surprises. After rising from this fall, she arrives at Moor House where her skills she learned at Marsh End are tested. Two major men teach Jane to appreciate the complexities of her emotions and passions for life: Mr. Both are antithesis of each other but both help Jane blossom into a woman with morals and ideals. Rochester, she thrives in Thornfield’s environment where she does not need to suppress her passion and responds naturally to Rochester’s strong fervor. Because she did not receive proper moral schooling as a child, she did not know how to control her emotions.

This problem is solved when Rochester fully exploits Jane’s weakness to his advantage by constantly making her feel jealous and inferior. Similar to many of the great feministic novels of its time, Jane Eyre purely emerges as a story focused on the quest for love. The novel’s protagonist, Jane, searches not only for the romantic side of love, but ultimately for a sense of self-worth and independence. Set in the overlapping times of the Victorian and Gothic periods, the novel touches upon both women’s supposed rights, and their inner struggle for liberty. Orphaned at an early age, Jane was born into a modest lifestyle, without any major parent roles to guide her through life’s obstacles. In Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, the characters come to learn that secrets do more harm than good through Edward Rochester’s secrecy after the fire in his room, Mrs. Reed not telling her about the letter from her uncle, and Edward Rochester’s secret marriage with Bertha.

First, Rochester, who really knows what happened during the fire in his room, refuses to tell Jane the full truth so as to not hurt her. The novel Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Brontë, depicts the coming of age of a woman who encounters great hardships, obstacles, and heartbreak. During the Victorian era women were subordinate to men and often times lacked the same opportunities and privileges that society and the family structure gave to men. Although society and the family structure of the Victorian era treated men and women differently, men were also oppressed, experienced suffering, and had to overcome poverty, but due to the masculinity that men were forced to portray during the era often times the hardships of men have been overlooked when analyzing the men in Jane Eyre. Jane Eyre’, Jane instantly manages to make the reader empathise with her character. Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change. Mary Shelley, in addition to the direct interpretation, suggests with this declaration that not only are humans resistant to and resentful of change, but so too are the societies in which they live, especially when the social order is directly challenged.

Their critiques, especially in the beginning, are received with scorn and contempt. I am a free human being with an independent will. This quote expresses Charlotte’s beliefs on women’s equalities. Charlotte Bronte was born in 1816. She was one of six children and lived in Yorkshire County England. She first worked as a governess in the Sidewick family then in the White family for only nine months. Charlotte wanted more for herself, and none of her jobs satisfied her ambitions.

When she moved back home, she discovered her sister, Emily’s, poetry and decided to publish a selection of the poems all three sisters wrote. How can a girl, who started out with nothing, blossom into a well educated, generous, blissful woman. Well, in Jane Eyre, the main character overcomes all obstacles thrown at her and makes a great life for herself. From a miserable, orphaned young girl to a happily married, well educated woman, Jane Eyre transforms immensely throughout the novel. Through her many experiences in essential locations, she grows significantly at Gateshead, Lowood School, Thornfield, Marsh End, and Ferndean. The novel begins at Gateshead where Jane is a young, ten year old, orphaned child who is miserable and unwanted by her aunt and cousins. In the book Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë, secrets cause much distrust aimed at the secret holder and pain to the ones either holding or discovering the secret with examples found in secrets like those of Rochester really being the gypsy, Jane’s secret reading spot, Mrs.

Reed keeping the letter from Jane, and Mr. Rochester’s wife in the attic. Rochester is disguised as the gypsy and tells the ladies these mysterious fortunes, it in cases hurts some mentally, but more importantly in Jane’s case it leads to distrust of Mr. To many material wealth is the epitome of mankind’s earthly desires. With wealth comes money, possessions, a promise of freedom from social constraints and the ability to pursue your dreams. However, the influence it has on a person’s character can be a stark reminder of what the misuse of wealth can ultimately lead to. In both Great Expectations by Charles Dickens and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte the corrupting nature of monetary wealth is displayed through the lives of multiple characters.

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