If i were prime minister for a day essay

Social Democratic hegemony in Swedish politics, which had seen 40 years of unbroken rule by the party. His father Gunnar Palme was a businessman, if i were prime minister for a day essay of Sven Theodore Palme and Baroness Hanna Maria von Born-Sarvilahti.

Sweden from Russia as a refugee in 1915. The von Knieriem do not count as members of the Baltische Ridderschaft. Palme’s father died when he was six years old. A sickly child, Olof Palme received his education from private tutors. He studied at the Sigtuna School of Liberal Arts, one of Sweden’s few residential high schools, and passed the university entrance examination with high marks at the age of 17. After graduation he traveled throughout the country and eventually ended up in Detroit, where his hero Reuther agreed to an interview which lasted several hours. In later years, Palme regularly remarked during his many subsequent American visits, that the United States had made him a socialist, a remark that often has caused confusion.

Within the context of his American experience, it was not that Palme was repelled by what he found in America, but rather that he was inspired by it. In 1951, he became a member of the social democratic student association in Stockholm, although it is asserted he did not attend their political meetings at the time. The following year he was elected President of the Swedish National Union of Students. As a student politician he concentrated on international affairs and travelled across Europe. He also was a member of the Worker’s Educational Association. In 1965, he became Minister of Transport and Communications.

One issue of special interest to him was the further development of radio and television, while ensuring their independence from commercial interests. Palme came there and tried to comfort the students, urging them to use democratic methods for the pursuit of their cause. 1969, Palme was elected as the new leader by the Social Democratic party congress and succeeded Erlander as Prime Minister. This was due in part to his international activities, especially those directed against the US foreign policy, and in part to his aggressive and outspoken debating style.

As leader of a new generation of Swedish Social Democrats, Olof Palme was often described as a “revolutionary reformist”. Domestically, his democratic socialist views, especially the drive to expand Labour Union influence over business ownership, engendered a great deal of hostility from the organized business community. The Palme cabinet continued to govern the country but several times they had to draw lots to decide on some issues, although most important issues were decided through concessional agreement. Tax rates also rose from being fairly low even by European standards to the highest levels in the Western world.

Sweden became efficient, with the infant mortality rate standing at 12 per 1,000 live births. In 1974, supplementary unemployment assistance was established, providing benefits to those workers ineligible for existing benefits. In 1971, eligibility for invalidity pensions was extended with greater opportunities for employees over the age of 60. In 1974, universal dental insurance was introduced, and former maternity benefits were replaced by a parental allowance. In 1974, housing allowances for families with children were raised and these allowances were extended to other low-income groups.

Childcare centres were also expanded under Palme, and separate taxation of husband and wife introduced. Access to pensions for older workers in poor health was liberalised in 1970, and a disability pension was introduced for older unemployed workers in 1972. The Palme cabinet was also active in the field of education, introducing such reforms as a system of loans and benefits for students, regional universities, and preschool for all children. In 1975, a law was passed that established free admission to universities. A number of reforms were also carried out to enhance workers’ rights. An employment protection Act of 1974 introduced rules regarding consultation with unions, notice periods, and grounds for dismissal, together with priority rules for dismissals and re-employment in case of redundancies.

In 1976, an Act on co-determination at work was introduced that allowed unions to be consulted at various levels within companies before major changes were enforced that would affect employees, while management had to negotiate with labour for joint rights in all matters concerning organisation of work, hiring and firing, and key decisions affecting the workplace. Olof Palme’s last government, elected during a time when Sweden’s economy was in difficult shape, sought to pursue a “third way,” designed to stimulate investment, production, and employment, having ruled out classical Keynesian policies as a result of the growing burden of foreign debt, together with the big balance of payments and budget deficits. For instance, taxes on wealth, gifts, and inheritance were increased, while tax benefits to shareholders were either reduced or eliminated. In addition, various welfare cuts carried out before Olof’s return to office were rescinded. An outspoken supporter of gender equality, Palme sparked interest for women’s rights issues by attending a World Women’s Conference in Mexico.

The controversial film, depicting two social outcasts, was scheduled to be released in an edited form but Palme thought the material was too socially important to be cut. His intervention in Sweden’s 1980 referendum on the future of nuclear power is often pinpointed by opponents of nuclear power as saving it. As of 2011, nuclear power remains one of the most important sources of energy in Sweden, much attributed to Palme’s actions. Shortly before his assassination, Palme had been accused of being pro-Soviet and not sufficiently safeguarding Sweden’s national interest. Palme and Nguyen were both invited as speakers.

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