How to answer a law essay question

Why do I how to answer a law essay question to complete a CAPTCHA? Completing the CAPTCHA proves you are a human and gives you temporary access to the web property. What can I do to prevent this in the future? If you are on a personal connection, like at home, you can run an anti-virus scan on your device to make sure it is not infected with malware.

If you are at an office or shared network, you can ask the network administrator to run a scan across the network looking for misconfigured or infected devices. Another way to prevent getting this page in the future is to use Privacy Pass. Please forward this error screen to 52. How to Write a Law Essay. In a college legal studies course, and in some law school courses, you may be required to write a research paper addressing a legal topic. These essays can be tricky, because the law is constantly evolving. To secure a top grade, your essay must be well-researched and coherently argued.

With proper planning and research, you can write a stellar legal essay. Carefully read the assignment prompt. Your professor will provide a prompt or set of instructions about the contents of your paper and how it should be formatted. Your professor may ask you to research and answer a specific question, or give you flexibility to choose your own subtopic within the overall subject matter of the course. A narrow essay prompt might read, “Discuss the evolution and impact of the exclusionary rule of evidence in the United States.

If you are invited to choose your own topic, your professor may require you to submit a written proposal or outline to ensure that your chosen topic complies with the prompt. If you are not sure if your topic is within the parameters of the prompt, propose your topic to your professor after class or during his or her office hours. Sometimes, an essay prompt will require you to read and write about a certain book or set of materials. Before settling on an essay topic, read any assigned materials, and review your textbooks and lecture notes.

Different students favor different methods of brainstorming to come up with ideas. Try writing a list of ideas, or create an “idea map” by circling your topic in the center of a page and writing new questions, arguments, and facts branching off of the central topic. Hopefully, your course readings, lectures, and class discussions will have given you enough background knowledge to select a topic. If not, review your class notes and browse online for additional background information. It is not uncommon to change your topic after doing some research. You may end up narrowing the questions your essay will answer, or changing your topic completely. Choose an essay topic of interest to you.

It will be easier to write on a topic you care passionately or curious about than one you have on which you have no strong feelings. You will feel motivated to research the issue thoroughly and should enjoy the writing process more. If you can, try to focus on an are of the law that affects you. Identify what types of sources you are required to use. Academic researchers use “primary, secondary, and tertiary sources. Primary sources are firsthand accounts of the subject matter.

Secondary sources analyze primary sources. Tertiary sources provide an overview of primary and secondary sources. Your prompt may require you to use a certain number of primary and secondary sources, and may prohibit you from citing tertiary sources entirely. You may also be limited in the number of internet-based sources you can use, and may be required to do a certain amount of library research. If you are prohibited from citing internet resources, you can still use online research to guide you to physical primary and secondary sources in your local library or bookstore.

Tertiary sources include encyclopedias, dictionaries, guidebooks, and textbooks that distill or collect information from primary and secondary sources. Usually, you should not cite to a tertiary source in your essay. Use these sources to find primary and secondary sources. Look at footnotes, citations, and indexes in tertiary sources. These are great for finding books, articles, and legal cases that are relevant to your topic. Also take note of the names of authors, who may have written multiple works on your topic.

If you can, go to a law library, which will have more specialized resources. A librarian can help you locate sources and navigate through state and federal case law reporters and books of statutory law. He or she may also provide you with access to subscription-only legal search engines. Different academic fields often use different search engines. Also find search engines for related fields, such as history or political science. Ask your librarian to recommend specialized search engines tailored to other disciplines that may have contributed to your topic.

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